Supreme Court refuses anti-net neutrality appeals

Supreme Court refuses anti-net neutrality appeals

Supreme Court refuses anti-net neutrality appeals

The Trump administration is asking the Supreme Court to fast-track cases on the president's decision to end a program that shields young immigrants from deportation.

The rules, which were issued in 2015, have since been replaced by a 2018 order by the Federal Communications Commission eliminating net neutrality, so the justices were not expected to weigh in on the merits of these cases. While neither of the latter Justices cited a reason for dismissing themselves from the appeal, Justice Kavanaugh had been involved in the initial ruling while seated on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals.

In September 2017, the government announced plans to phase out the program, but lower court judges blocked the administration from doing so and ordered that renewals of protections for recipients continue until the appeals are resolved.

"Absent prompt intervention from this court, there is little chance the court would resolve this dispute for at least another year", Francisco wrote in a letter to the Supreme Court.

The Department of Justice made the request Monday after the lower courts failed to meet a deadline for a decision on DACA.

The court did not disclose how individual justices voted in the California case. The high court doesn't typically take cases before federal appeals courts rule on them.

That court, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, heard arguments in May but hasn't ruled.

Jessica Rosenworcel, the Federal Communication Commission's only Democratic Commissioner, noted that the FCC had argued that because the Trump-era FCC had repealed the 2015 rules, the 2016 decision was moot and should be wiped from the books. "Let's call this interesting".

As one of the plaintiffs in the case, TechFreedom, notes, Kavanaugh wrote "a powerful dissent from the D.C. Circuit's decision past year not to rehear a panel decision upholding the 2015 Order". The D.C. Circuit Court found that the FCC was well within its authority to adopt net neutrality rules that prevented Internet service companies from blocking, throttling, or otherwise degrading traffic. If you watched as the FCC repealed net neutrality using little more than lobbyist fluff and nonsense, it should be fairly obvious to you that wasn't true. The Pai-led FCC is defending its net neutrality repeal against a lawsuit filed by dozens of litigants, including 22 state attorneys general, consumer advocacy groups, and tech companies.

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