Mount Etna: Earthquake hits Sicily after eruption at Europe's most active volcano

Mount Etna: Earthquake hits Sicily after eruption at Europe's most active volcano

Mount Etna: Earthquake hits Sicily after eruption at Europe's most active volcano

At least ten people have been reportedly injured in an natural disaster that hit Sicily only a day after the iconic Mount Etna erupted from a new fissure, covering the Italian island with volcanic ash.

The natural disaster hit at 3:19 a.m. (0219 GMT), prompting many people to run out of their homes and sleep in cars.

A Christmas Eve eruption of Mount Etna, the most active volcano in Europe, was the first since spring of 2017.

Television footage showed damage to older buildings in the towns of Santa Venerina and Zafferana Etnea.

Italy's national seismology institute said the quake had a magnitude of 4.8 on the open-ended Richter scale and 4.9 on the moment magnitude scale, which relates to the amount the ground slips.

"Etna remains a unsafe volcano, and this country of ours is unfortunately fragile", government undersecretary Vito Crimi said as he reported 10 people injured.

Debris sits on the street in front of a heavily damaged house in Fleri, Sicily Italy, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018.

The most seriously injured was a 70-year-old man who fractured ribs and was undergoing surgery for chest injuries.

An elderly woman suffered multiple fractures, Agi news agency reported, while 18 people made it on their own to hospital to be treated for minor cuts and shock.

Etna has been particularly active since July.

Video and images were posted on social media.

An airport at the city of Catania continued to operate and a coastal highway nearby was reopened late in the day after being partially shut down.

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]