China's Chang'e 4 Peers Into Vastness of Moon's Unexplored Far Side

China's Chang'e 4 Peers Into Vastness of Moon's Unexplored Far Side

China's Chang'e 4 Peers Into Vastness of Moon's Unexplored Far Side

But this new one is the first that shows the Moon in its entirety.

China's Longjiang-2 satellite, along with the Queqiao communications probe, has been in lunar orbit since June 2018.

The photo was taken with a camera linked to an amateur radio transceiver on board the Chinese DSLWP-B/Longjiang-2 satellite.

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently caught a view of China National Space Administration's Chang'e-4 lander on the lunar surface. It might just be the first image of the moon's backside together with Earth that we've seen since another Chinese spacecraft, Chang'e 5T1, took a shot of both bodies together in 2014. As for the photo of the Earth and the "dark side of the Moon", it was transmitted back to Earth and received with the Dwingeloo Telescope. Queqiiao satellite played a significant role in the entire landing mission.

During the Chang'e-4 landing, DSLWP-B remained silent for some days to avoid interfering with the communication between the ground controllers and the Chang'e-4 lander.

The image above was snapped by a camera aboard the Chinese DSLWP-B / Longjiang-2 satellite on February 4. However, the tiny satellite became active again on 13th January 2019.

Queqiao and Longjiang-2 are still orbiting the moon, though, so we'll likely see many more stunning images of our closest neighbor in the future.

Most astronomers agree that the Moon was formed in a huge impact between a Mars-sized object and the Earth, about 100 million years after the formation of the Solar System.

The photo captured by the satellite three days back was downloaded by the Dwingeloo Telescope in the Netherlands.

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