Beresheet Spacecraft Snaps Stunning Picture Shortly Before Crashing Into Moon

Beresheet Spacecraft Snaps Stunning Picture Shortly Before Crashing Into Moon

Beresheet Spacecraft Snaps Stunning Picture Shortly Before Crashing Into Moon

Mission control reset the spacecraft to try and kickstart the engine, which appeared to work a few seconds later, but shortly afterwards communication with the craft were severed. It was built by state-owned IAI and Israeli non-profit space venture SpaceIL with $100 million funded nearly entirely by private donors.

Despite a landing that most likely resulted in the destruction of Beresheet, minutes after the crash, X Prize founder and Executive Chairman Peter Diamandis and CEO Anousheh Ansari said SpaceIL and IAI will still receive the award despite the craft's unfortunate ending. Scientifically, the mission aims "to understand the lunar geology at the landing site [and to] measure the crustal magnetic field and interpret its history on the Moon". "It is by far the smallest, cheapest spacecraft ever to get to the moon", he said.

"I regret to say that our spacecraft did not make it in one piece to the moon", said Opher Doron, the manager of Israel Aerospace Industries' Space Division.

It had been hoped that the small robotic spacecraft, built by the non-profit SpaceIL and state-owned Israel Aerospace Industries, would match a feat that has been achieved only by the national space agencies of three countries: U.S., Russian Federation and China.

The small robotic spacecraft, built by the nonprofit SpaceIL and state-owned Israel Aerospace Industries, had hoped to match a feat that has only been achieved by the national space agencies of three countries: U.S., Russian Federation and China. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

"If at first you don't succeed, try again", Netanyahu said.

Beresheet was launched into Earth's orbit on 29 February.

Its circuitous flight path was around 4 million miles (6.5 million km).

The spacecraft had travelled through space for close to seven weeks orbiting the earth before crashlanding on the moon.

"I have no doubt that Israel and SpaceIL will continue to explore and I look forward to celebrating their future achievements", he added.

Now, a press release from SpaceIL confirmed those reports, stating that a technical glitch in one of Beresheet's components caused the spacecraft's main engine to malfunction. The contest ended in March 2018 with no victor.

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