Supermassive Black Holes on Collision Course Discovered 2.5 Billion Light Years Away

Supermassive Black Holes on Collision Course Discovered 2.5 Billion Light Years Away

Supermassive Black Holes on Collision Course Discovered 2.5 Billion Light Years Away

"If the gravitational wave background is not detected this could indicate that supermassive black holes merge only over extremely long timescales, remaining as close separation binaries for many Hubble times, the so-called 'final-parsec problem, '" write the researchers.

The black hole, which is about 250 million times heavier than the sun, lies at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147 and is 140 million light-years from Earth.

The astronomers initially selected this galaxy to validate accepted models about lower-luminosity active galaxies-those with black holes that are on a meager diet of material.

Successful detection of gravitational waves would give astrophysicists a better understanding of how massive galaxies and black holes evolve.

Supermassive black holes are usually found at the center of large galaxies, including our own Milky Way.

When galaxies collide, the black holes at their hearts begin a dance that lasts a very, very long time.

An worldwide team of astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope found a thin disk whirling around a supermassive black hole 130 million light-years away, but the disk shouldn't exist there based on current theories. Nonetheless, researchers are presently unclear as to the time it takes for black holes to merge - or indeed if they merge at all.

Black holes in certain types of galaxies like NGC 3147 are malnourished because there is not enough gravitationally captured material to feed them regularly.

"It is a major embarrassment for astronomy that we don't know if supermassive black holes merge", stated Jenny Greene, a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton and co-author of the examine. "For everybody in black gap physics, observationally this can be a lengthy-standing puzzle that we have to clear up".

Around 2.5 billion light-years away from Earth, Princeton scientists detected two supermassive black holes on a collision course. Enlisting the help of gravitational wave physicists, the monster black holes 2.5 billion light years away help to refine the estimates of how common supermassive black hole pairs like this actually are.

The Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by NASA and the ESA, is fantastic for spotting objects residing in the distant reaches of space.

So this type of black hole shouldn't exist but it does - making the behemoth, mysterious cosmic phenomena even more intriguing.

"What's more, the galaxy's core is shooting out two unusually large plumes of gas". However, researchers are now unclear as to the time it takes for black holes to merge - or indeed, if they merge at all.

Also, it seems that based on the location of the other known supermassive black holes, the scientists are expecting to pick up the ways that are given of by other crashes within the next 5 years or so, according to the same press release. The team is now looking at other galaxies similar to the one harboring the newfound supermassive black hole pair.

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