RCMP find item that may be connected to McLeod and Schmegelsky investigation

RCMP find item that may be connected to McLeod and Schmegelsky investigation

RCMP find item that may be connected to McLeod and Schmegelsky investigation

Police said two firearms were found near the bodies, and forensic analysis is underway to confirm whether these weapons are connected with the northern B.C. homicide investigations.

Two bodies, thought to be of McLeod and Schmegelsky, were found near the Nelson River in northern Manitoba on August 7.

RCMP have not confirmed that the procedures had been completed, saying in an email Sunday evening that more information would be provided on Monday.

The bodies were found about one kilometre away from several unidentified items police said were "directly linked" to the pair.

Assistant Commissioner Jane MacLatchy of the Manitoba RCMP called the discovery of those items "key" in narrowing the search for the men.

Alex McKeen is a Vancouver-based reporter covering transportation and labour.

Mounties were expected to release an update on the investigation Monday, though a time and location for a news conference have not been announced.

Four days later on another BC highway Schmegelsky and McLeod were accused of murdering 64-year-old botanist Leonard Dyck, stealing his Toyota RAV4 and driving it 3000km east across northern Canada until dumping and burning the vehicle outside the small town of Gillam, Manitoba.

The bodies were also found approximately 5 miles from where police located a burned-out vehicle they believe belonged to the suspects on July 22 and approximately 2,000 miles from where the murders took place in northern British Columbia.

Manitoba RCMP found bodies believed to be Bryer Schmegelsky and Kam McLeod on Wednesday.

Manaigre said Manitoba RCMP remain in the area in case more leads develop to assist B.C. homicide investigators.

"We were describing it over the last couple of weeks as being some pretty dense bush and some pretty remarkable terrain - in my opinion that's nearly an understatement", said Manaigre, who participated in police searches after the bodies were found.

"We were describing it over the last couple of weeks as being some pretty dense bush and some pretty remarkable terrain - in my opinion that's nearly an understatement", he said.

"It was incredible. The steep hills, you've got a fast moving river with very little riverbank...."

Manaigre said there is still no indication of a motive in the B.C. killings. "And we hope we can get some answers on that question".

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