Supreme Court turns away challenge to 'bump stock' ban

Supreme Court turns away challenge to 'bump stock' ban

Supreme Court turns away challenge to 'bump stock' ban

Bump stocks, that allows a shot to fire constantly with one pull of the cause, figured prominently in that the 2017 mass shooting for an outdoor concert in vegas that killed 58 people and injured 500 other people - that the deadliest shooting modern USA history.

The justices heard arguments in the administration's appeal of a lower court ruling that a Sri Lankan asylum seeker - a farmer named Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam -had a right under the US Constitution to have his case reviewed by a federal court. The justices additionally rejected to briefly spare from the complainants in case from the ban.

Once attached to a rifle in place of the normal stock, or end piece, bump stocks allowed rounds to be fired in quick succession, almost as fast as an automatic weapon.

The bump stock rule essentially expanded the National Firearms Act and the Gun Control Act's definition of machine guns to include bump stock devices, thus making possession of bump stock devices a felony punishable for up to 10 years in prison.

President Donald Trump said that the government would move to ban bump stocks, following a 2017 shooting in Las Vegas in which a gunman attached bump stocks to assault-style rifles he used to shoot concertgoers from his hotel room.

Abortion rights demonstrators rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington Wednesday
Abortion rights demonstrators rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington Wednesday

A federal court refused to issue an injunction against the ban, saying the plaintiffs would likely lose the case.

The court struck down an nearly identical Texas law four years ago, but since then the court has become more conservative, especially with the retirement in 2018 of swing voter Justice Anthony Kennedy, who often sided with liberal justices on abortion rights. It was the third time the court was asked to issue such an order. But he criticized the lower court's deference to a federal agency - the bureau - that had changed its interpretation of a longstanding law.

The Supreme Court in December heard arguments in the first major gun dispute to come before the justices since 2010 - a challenge backed by the NRA to a handgun transport restriction in New York City.

Owners, dealers and manufacturers were required to destroy the devices or turn them into a local Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives office.

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