Hamann joins criticism of Liverpool over furloughing non-playing staff

Hamann joins criticism of Liverpool over furloughing non-playing staff

Hamann joins criticism of Liverpool over furloughing non-playing staff

But Liverpool, who lead the league by 25 points, followed fellow 2019 Champions League finalists Tottenham in announcing that some non-playing staff would be furloughed since the competition has been indefinitely suspended.

The government said it was "concerned" by the standoff between players and their clubs.

Members of the workforce that are affected can claim 80 per cent of their wages - up to £2,500 a month - from the United Kingdom government, though Liverpool will top up any shortfall in their pay.

However, after showing signs of their mortality against Watford, Chelsea and Atlético Madrid in rapid succession, their behind-the-scenes operation is now under the microscope, after taking the controversial decision to furlough staff in the midst of the coronavirus crisis.

"I'm particularly disappointed with the decision coming from Liverpool yesterday because it runs against the togetherness and unity the club has always been renowned for, particularly over the last 30 years since Hillsborough", Murphy said. We were told this would happen and we made a statement.

"We remain determined to protect our people, their jobs and our business".

"Our belief is that no million-pound plus profit-making organisation should be relying on taxpayer subsidies in times of crisis, yet football as a money-making industry has been singled out.

"Whatever way you look at it, we're easy targets". We are in a very privileged position.

"At a time like this, we have to give something back". "Where were the journalists then looking for quotes?".

However former Reds gamers Jamie Carragher and Stan Collymore strongly criticised the transfer by the European champions, who in February introduced pre-tax income of 42 million kilos ($51 million) for 2018/19.

Former England captain Wayne Rooney has been forthright in his views during the coronavirus crisis
Former England captain Wayne Rooney has been forthright in his views during the coronavirus crisis

Hamann later tweeted to describe the action as "contrary to the morals and values of the club I got to know".

Certainly the timing is poor.

A meeting of Premier League clubs on Friday ended with agreement on the need to ask players to see 30 per cent of their pay cut or deferred.

"It's now not just about Burnley or any other individual club any more, it's about the whole football ecosystem from the Premier League downwards and all the other businesses and communities that feed from that ecosystem". Arsenal's Aubameyang has reportedly responded to Liverpool captain Jordan Henderson.

Crystal Palace's Andros Townsend has accused the British government's Health Secretary of "deflecting blame" onto footballers after Matt Hancock said they should take a pay cut during the coronavirus crisis.

The announcement came as the Premier League was holding talks on Saturday with clubs, captains and managers to discuss possible wage cuts of 30% for players during the suspension.

The PFA insisted players intend to make "significant financial contributions" but warned reducing their wages would result in reduced taxation for the government to spend on public services.

"Taking a 30 percent salary deduction will cost the Exchequer a substantial sum", it said.

"This would be detrimental to our NHS [National Health Service] and other government-funded services", the Professional Footballers' Association said in a statement.

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