Major League Baseball owners approve post-coronavirus return plan, eye July start to season

Major League Baseball owners approve post-coronavirus return plan, eye July start to season

Major League Baseball owners approve post-coronavirus return plan, eye July start to season

The 30 control people for the teams were briefed Monday by commissioner Rob Manfred and his staff on what exactly will be put on paper and given to the union for its perusal. Then, if they sign off on the idea, the league will present the plan to the players Tuesday.

When Major League Baseball first discussed a return from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, it seemed that the most logical option was for all teams to play in a few specific locations to avoid travel.

A 30-man roster with a taxi squad that would have upward of 50 players available. That plus the regionalizing of the schedule is created to limit as much travel as possible.

Spring training likely would not include any games, as teams could get ready for the season at their home stadiums. Major League Baseball is concerned about a second wave of the coronavirus coming and making games in November more untenable. Heyman notes that an 82-game season with an extra round of playoffs is among the possibilities tabled for discussion.

The big obstacles are going to be MLB's ability to display protocols, personnel and equipment that make the players feel safe about returning not only to stadiums, but to buses, planes and hotels.

The union is now locked into that as a non-starter.

Nightengale reports the proposal also offers a glimpse into a reconfigured 2020 season.

The main parts of the plan are pretty much known by now: MLB wants to move with ahead an 80-game season beginning in July (with no minor-league system), playing in home ballparks with or without fans, and an expanded postseason format. League officials reportedly said that teams are expected to lose about 40 per cent of their gross revenue from ticket sales, concessions and parking.

The meeting between MLB and the MLB Players Association on Tuesday will set the stage for what both parties expect to be a contentious negotiation.

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]