George Floyd's North Carolina memorial service

George Floyd's North Carolina memorial service

George Floyd's North Carolina memorial service

Mourners from across North Carolina waited at a fast-moving line out a church in the little town of Raeford - about 35 kilometers from George Floyd's hometown of Fayetteville - in which a memorial service has been held.

Local authorities anticipate somewhere between 30,000 to 40,000 people to come to the Cape Fear Conference B Headquarters in Raeford, North Carolina. Floyd was 46 when he died.

The former vice president opted for a private meeting because he doesn't want his Secret Service protection detail to disrupt the family's funeral service and because he wants to pay his respects in private, CBS News reported on Sunday.

Two lines of people about 100 deep formed separate lines at the entrance to the church.

When a hearse bearing Floyd's coffin arrived Saturday, chants of "Black Power", "George Floyd" and "No justice, no peace", echoed. "It might have been my brother, my dad, some of my friends that are black", said a guy from the audience, Erik Carlos of Fayetteville. "It was a heavy hit, especially knowing that George Floyd was born near my hometown".

A conference center spokeswoman told the station there have been calls from California, Georgia and Indiana.

Heavy traffic was reported along US 401 for George Floyd public viewing in Raeford N.C
Heavy traffic was reported along US 401 for George Floyd public viewing in Raeford N.C

Mourners could be seen wearing masks and various shirts with George Floyd's face on it, with messages like "I Can't Breathe" on them.

People raise their fists during a rally, Friday, June 5, 2020, in Las Vegas, against police brutality sparked by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25. Chauvin has been charged with murder.

Three other Minneapolis police officers - Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao - were charged on Wednesday with aiding and abetting murder in Floyd's death.

A bystander recorded the incident with a cell phone camera and posted the footage online.

Chris Trabot, who works for Paris City Hall and is black, said Floyd's death triggered his decision to demonstrate for the first time in his life. "It's time for us to stand up in George's name and say, 'Get your knee off our necks!'" For a period, Floyd also lived in Houston, Texas before making his way to Minnesota.

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]